Ann Tweedy on Allotment Era Literature and Whether there were Justifiable Expectations about the End of Tribes

Ann Tweedy has posted her forthcoming paper, “How Allotment-Era Literature Can Inform Current Controversies About Tribal Jurisdiction and Reservation Diminishment,” on SSRN. It is forthcoming in the University of Toronto Quarterly.

The abstract:

In a previous article, Unjustifiable Expectations: Laying to Rest the Ghosts of Allotment-Era Settlers, I argued that a review of historical newspaper articles showed that the expectations of non-Indians who purchased lands on Sioux reservations in South Dakota during the allotment-era as to tribes’ disappearing were not justifiable because they were rooted in an expectation of continued injustice towards tribes. I thus concluded that the Supreme Court should not presume that these allotment-era settlers had justifiable expectations when it decides reservation diminishment and tribal jurisdiction casesThis article addresses whether allotment-era literature pertaining to Sioux peoples can similarly help inform such cases. Although the results were more mixed, particularly with non-Indian-authored fiction, the works of Native writers such as Luther Standing Bear, Charles Eastman, and Zitkala-Ša were helpful in explicating the injustices in the federal government’s land dealings with tribes, as was a work by non-Native historian Doane Robinson.

This entry was posted in Author: Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Scholarship and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Ann Tweedy on Allotment Era Literature and Whether there were Justifiable Expectations about the End of Tribes

  1. Thanks very much for posting this paper information.

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