NYTs on California’s “Forced Apprenticeship” of Indians (Civil War History Series)

Here.

An excerpt:

On April 27, 1863, nearly five months after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, California abolished its system of forced apprenticeship for American Indians. Under the apprenticeship provisions of the state’s Act for the Government and Protection of Indians, several thousand California Indians, mostly children, had suffered kidnapping, sale and involuntary servitude for over a decade.

Also:

Sources: “An Act for the Government and Protection of Indians, April 22, 1850”; Michael Magliari, “Free Soil, Unfree Labor,” Pacific Historical Review 73 (August 2004); “Minority Report of the Special Joint Committee on the Mendocino War,” in Appendix to the Journals of the California Senate (1860); “An Act Amendatory of an Act entitled ‘An Act for the Government and Protection of Indians,’ April 16, 1860”; Mendocino Herald, April 10, 1863; George Hanson to William P. Dole, July 15, 1861, Office of Indian Affairs, Letters Received; Sacramento Union, May 5 – 12, 1862; Brendan C. Lindsay, “Murder State: California’s Native American Genocide, 1846 – 1873”; Elijah Steele to William P. Dole, Oct. 30, 1863, Office of Indian Affairs, Letters Received; Report of the Commissioner for Indian Affairs, 1867; Alta California, June 8, 1874.

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One Response to NYTs on California’s “Forced Apprenticeship” of Indians (Civil War History Series)

  1. Ron Andrade says:

    Read the article in the New York Times and it reads more as a white-apologist trying to compare the Emancipation Proclamation to the Indian people. There were attempts to end the forced apprentice requirements of Indians but we were still not allowed to testify against a white man till much later. The idea of stopping the forced apprentice requirement of Indian youngs was stopped but not the practice of selling an Indians jail sentence to a white farmer for payment of the jail fine. And it might come as a shock to the writer that this forced servitude continued in to the 1950/1960s.

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