National Indian Law Library (2/1/2017)

Here:

The National Indian Law Library added new content to the Indian Law Bulletins on 2/1/17.

U.S. Federal Courts Bulletin
http://www.narf.org/nill/bulletins/federal/2017.html
Jones v. United States (Bad Men Treaty Provision)
United States v. Barnes (Oklevueha Native American Church; Marijuana Manufacturing)
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau v. Great Plains Lending, LLC (Tribal Sovereign Immunity – Consumer Lending)
United States v. Bear (Criminal Jurisdiction)

Tribal Courts Bulletin
http://www.narf.org/nill/bulletins/tribal/2016.html
Deserly v. Fort Peck Tribes (Tribal Court Jurisdiction; Healing to Wellness Court)
In re S.B.H. (Child Welfare – Custody; Child Support)
Crofford v. Baker (Employment Termination)
Luond v. Mashantucket Pequot Gaming Enterprise (Employment Termination)

News Bulletin
http://www.narf.org/nill/bulletins/news/currentnews.html
In the Intergovernmental section, we feature some stories about the newly appointed Justice to the U.S. Supreme Court and his impacts on American Indian law issues.

U.S. Regulatory Bulletin
http://www.narf.org/nill/bulletins/regulatory/2017.html
We feature a rule from the Department of Interior, Indian Gaming Commission, regarding Privacy Act procedures.

Law Review & Bar Journal Bulletin
http://www.narf.org/nill/bulletins/lawreviews/2017.html
Here are the articles featured this week:
Protecting vulnerable children in Indian Country: Why and how the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 should be extended to cover child abuse committed on Indian reservations.
Oral tradition and the Kennewick man.
Assessing political economy in Native American nations.
A legal practitioner’s guide to Indian and tribal law research.
Why the Religious Freedom Restoration Act cannot protect sacred sites.
Money is for nothing: The inherent want of consideration found in substantial exclusivity terms within tribal-state compacts.
A silent epidemic: Revisiting the 2013 Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act to better protect American Indian and Alaska Native women.
Complex adaptive peacemaking: How systems theory reveals advantages of traditional tribal dispute resolution methods.
Constitutional law—the reaffirmation of the lack of Sixth Amendment protections for indigent Native American defendants in Tribal court proceedings United States v. Bryant, 136 S. Ct. 1954 (2016).
Indians, tribes, and (federal) jurisdiction.

U.S. Legislation Bulletin
http://www.narf.org/nill/bulletins/legislation/115_uslegislation.html
One bill was added this week.
S.245: A bill to amend the Indian Tribal Energy Development and Self Determination Act of 2005, and for other purposes.

This entry was posted in Author: Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Research and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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