Category Archives: Scholarship

NCAI Webinar: Gun Purchases, Tribal Convictions, and Using the Instant Criminal Background Check System (Feb. 23 at 2pm)

Identifying dangerous persons across jurisdictions can help prevent needless tragedies. Keeping firearms away from persons who are legally prohibited from purchasing firearms requires collaboration across many jurisdictions—including tribal governments.  NCAI will be hosting a webinar on NICS, featuring a presentation … Continue reading

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New Scholarship on DAPL and Tribal Jurisdiction

Andrew Rome has published “Black Snake on the Periphery: The Dakota Access Pipeline and Tribal Jurisdictional Sovereignty” in the North Dakota Law Review.

Posted in Author: Matthew L.M. Fletcher, cultural resources, Environmental, Scholarship | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Mitchell Hamline Law Review Indian Law Symposium Issue

Here: Volume 43, Issue 4 (2017) “Animals May Take Pity on Us”: Using Traditional Tribal Beliefs to Address Animal Abuse and Family Violence Within Tribal Nations Sarah Deer and Liz Murphy Affirming a Pragmatic Development of Tribal Jurisprudential Principles Todd … Continue reading

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New Scholarship on Responsible Resource Development

Carla Fredericks, Kathleen Finn, Erica Gajda and Jesse Heibel have posted “Responsible Resource Development: A Strategic Plan to Consider Social and Cultural Impacts of Tribal Extractive Industry Development,” forthcoming in the Harvard Journal of Gender and Law. Here is the abstract: This paper presents a … Continue reading

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Michalyn Steele on Congressional Powers and Sovereignty in Indian Affairs

Michalyn Steele has posted “Congressional Power and Sovereignty in Indian Affairs” on SSRN. The paper is forthcoming in the Utah Law Review. Here is the abstract: The doctrine of inherent tribal sovereignty — that tribes retain aboriginal sovereign governing power over … Continue reading

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Gallegos and Fort on ICWA in the Harvard Public Health Review

Here. ICWA enhances protective factors by requiring court and agency compliance in child welfare proceedings with two cutting-edge provisions: active efforts and placement preferences. Congress deliberately created a higher standard for Indian child welfare proceedings requiring state agencies to provide … Continue reading

Posted in Author: Kate E. Fort, ICWA, Scholarship | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

NNABA Foundation Announces Bar Review Scholarship

The National Native American Bar Association (NNABA) Foundation is excited to announce the second year of its Bar Review Scholarship Program.  NNABA Foundation will award at least ten (10) $1,500 scholarships. To advance our mission to foster the development of … Continue reading

Posted in Author: Sarah Donnelly, Scholarship | Tagged , | Leave a comment

New Student Scholarship on Indian Country Cross Deps

Here is “Bridging the Jurisdictional Void: Cross-Deputization Agreements in Indian Country,” forthcoming in the Arizona State Law Journal. The abstract: Comment examines cross-deputization agreements in Indian Country, focusing on the relationship between tribes and state and local governments and the … Continue reading

Posted in Author: Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Scholarship | Tagged , | 1 Comment

American Indian Law Journal Volume 6, Issue 1

Here: Volume 6, Issue 1 (2017) Articles PDF By Any Means: How One Federal Agency is Turning Tribal Sovereignty on its Head Clifton Cottrell PDF Beyond a Zero-Sum Federal Trust Responsibility: Lessons from Federal Indian Energy Policy Monte Mills PDF … Continue reading

Posted in Author: Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Scholarship | Tagged | Leave a comment

Gregory Ablavsky on the Phrase “With the Indian Tribes” in the Commerce Clause

Gregory Abalvsky has posted “‘With the Indian Tribes’: Race, Citizenship, and Original Constitutional Meanings,” forthcoming in the Stanford Law Review. Here is the abstract: Under black-letter law declared in Morton v. Mancari, federal classifications of individuals as “Indian” based on … Continue reading

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